Not Loving Flickr

I made contacts of three individuals: elfelm because he is a great sports/events/music scene photographer, capturing the immediacy of a situation; Sonya Percival because her photos are beautiful, but sad and lonely; and DoreezDad because he takes pictures of Tacoma, the most interesting city I have ever lived in.

I like taking pictures with my Android phone. I take pictures of weird things while I am out running or walking the dog. Things like graffiti, snails, murals, mushrooms, couches (I live close to a University and whenever the kids move out, the streets are littered with couches).

I would love to post my shots to Flickr, but the options on my phone allow me to share them via: AllShare, Amazon Send to Kindle, Messaging, Bluetooth, Picasa, Facebook, Twitter, mysms, Gmail, Kodak, or Snapfish. Flickr is not an option. Yes, I could download a Flickr app, but, do I really want another Flickr if I already have Picasa? Nah.So, trying to upload photos to Flickr becomes a chore. I have to copy them from the phone to my laptop and try it from there. It’s not the same as being able to upload something on the fly. And in the 21st Century, I think that convenience, ease of use, and device-based- or OS-based-options  should trump everything else.

I would think that those who are using an iPhone are probably using Instagram to share photos more than they use Flickr. Tech changes with time and I wonder about the relevance of these old systems as new devices are making it less convenient to use them.

I did a little looking around, and there is an app for WordPress on Android. The app is supposed to let you upload photos to your posts. I will check that app out this week and set up a post with my findings.

In the meantime, I have not yet “followed” three accounts on Flickr. I am already growing increasingly unable to keep track of all the social networks I have signed up for already.

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2 thoughts on “Not Loving Flickr

  1. Kathy E. Gill

    Hi, Angie — there are advantages to using Flickr rather than Google (Picasa) or Facebook, primarily when it comes to retaining rights over how your photos are used by others. Instagram’s user base has dramatically reduced its use of the service since December: http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2013/01/instagram-terms-users/

    There is more than one reason to upload an image to the web. Having people share it – that’s one. Using the image in a blog post is another. If I were going to use Pinterest, I’d first upload images to Flickr, then pin them on Pinterest. The challenge with all sharing is tracking the shares.

    Reply
  2. Mark MacKay

    You don’t have to love flickr. You just need to use it. Consider who won’t see your work or who’s work you won’t see if you’re not on flickr? It doesn’t have to become your primary social media photo tool, but it can become part of your online photographic and digital portfolio. You’re chances for being found are increased if you’re on flickr.

    The second problem is a problem we all find. You need to research and develop a system to manage your social media tools, accounts, passwords, user names, email accounts, content, content update schedule, content retirement schedule, copyright issues per platform.

    I’m starting out with Excel and researching other places where I can store all of this information in an organized manner and possibly using a platform or tool that might suggest connections between different types of my content or reveal combinations or concepts I’ve been blind to. – MM

    Reply

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